LivingWell with diabetes - Fact sheet

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LivingWell is an online course that educates and empowers participants to transform the way they think about and manage diabetes – not just physically but also emotionally.

This fact sheet details what’s included in the course as well as the curriculum that participants will engage with.

According to anonymous exit surveys, 96% of LivingWell graduates feel the course helped them achieve or move toward their goal, 91% feel more positive about their future health and 96% would recommend it to others.

Enter your information to download the LivingWell fact sheet.

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Recent CDC diabetes report indicates impending disaster

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We have a dangerous epidemic spreading across America, and its name is diabetes. According to the CDC’s biennial National Diabetes Statistics Report released recently:

  • 30.3 million Americans have diabetes; this is 9.4% of the population.
  • 84.1 million Americans have prediabetes; if left untreated, prediabetes will often lead to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years.
  • Overall, there are 114 million Americans living with diabetes and prediabetes.

The social and financial consequences of diabetes are horrendous. According to the report, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death, costing the US upwards of $245 billion.

So yes, right now we most certainly have a problem. And if this trend goes on at its current rate, we will have what is more aptly termed a national disaster. Letting the type 2 diabetes epidemic hit full stride over the next couple of decades could ravage millions of families and both the healthcare and insurance industries like nothing we’ve ever seen before.

Fortunately the US government has taken action by implementing the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP or DPP). The DPP encourages adults who are overweight and have high blood sugar to engage in a lifestyle coaching curriculum. Designed to produce healthy weight loss, the DPP curriculum’s primary focus is healthy eating and regular exercise. It also touches on, healthy thinking, stress management and sleep.

There’s no doubt that the DPP is a step in the right direction toward the end goal of reversing the current trend of diabetes, and we commend the CDC on their DPP initiative. However, as a CDC-approved DPP provider, we are familiar with the curriculum … and we are concerned that not enough attention is given to the psychological and cognitive issues at the root of many people’s unhealthy eating habits. Perhaps that’s why a growing number of DPP coaches are incorporating the SelfHelpWorks online interventions in an effort to bolster their success rates.

This is no shocker, but perhaps it bears saying: Unhealthy eating habits are stubborn – even for folks who desperately want to eat better. They are stubborn because they exist in a deep-rooted emotional and psychological context that is very often ignored. When an individual is given the skills and tools to reprogram the parts of their brain that store these critical emotional and psychological attachments, bad eating habits can be permanently replaced with healthy ones. This is precisely what we do here at SelfHelpWorks.

Our video-based online course, LivingLean, focuses on exposing and disengaging the emotional connections unhealthy eaters have with the foods that make them overweight, so that they no longer feel a need to eat them. And our diabetes management course, LivingWell, educates and empowers participants to transform the way they think about their disease.  Our proprietary cognitive behavioral training process empowers participants to literally retrain their brain and rediscover their power to live a lean high-energy life, permanently free from the foods that have kept them unhealthy and overweight.

Yes, America has a diabetes problem. But when it comes to rewriting our future, there is most definitely a solution.

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